Cape Heart, Brooks: Republicans put Jackson ‘through hell’ to go to Fox

Columnists Jonathan Capehart and David Brooks joined PBS News Hour Judge Ketanji Brown hosted Judy Woodroff on Friday for their weekly panel discussion to recap the Supreme Court confirmation hearing. Together, the pair will accuse Republicans of throwing him into hell so they can get Fox.

Capehart went first and was annoyed by the Republicans, saying, “They can tear him apart, shorten his experience, tell him everything except the child of God, tell a mother that she is not only soft on crime, but good with him – man.” The child is paddling into pornography. It was just horrible. “

Referring to Corey Booker’s frightening speech directed at Jackson, Cape Hart declared, “I would have cried if my father-in-law and my mother-in-law hadn’t been sitting in the living room as we see it.

Alleging racism, Cape Hart added, “Seeing him sitting there, we’re looking at that picture now, I felt like I was looking, I was looking – watching a relative go through hell. And Senator Booker to remind him but the country. Remind her of why she was there, how hard she worked, how deserving she was, and how important it was not to let anyone take away her joy.

Annoyed by the fact that Jackson even had to face questions from Republicans, he concluded:

He is being interviewed for a job he always wanted and still people there are trashing him in different ways, we as African-Americans work hard to get to these spots and stay in these spots. And those — and– have to jump through these hoops and be interrogated by people who aren’t even on our level. But still we have to go to the tent, get a seat at the table and then put that seat.

Brooks later went on to announce that he had been deeply inspired by Cape Hart, and commented:

We have a group of Republican senators who are not really senators. They are merely TV hosts and they use these hearings as an occasion for any issue popular with money. And so whether ‘what is a woman?’ Or whatever, they will ask him about it. They’re not going to ask him about judicial philosophy, they’re not going to ask him about mood, they’re going to ask him what the problem is at the moment.

Ignoring the legal issues that could arise from not being able to define “woman”, Brooks turned to Ted Cruz in particular, “about whom I said nicely last week, I’m going to squam again this week … he makes– a Makes a big carafe and then leans back and checks out how she’s doing on Twitter. It’s like the perfect cycle of narcissists. “

Brooks may accuse Republicans of not questioning Jackson about his judicial philosophy, but this only raises the question of whether Brooks was really paying attention.

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Here is a transcript for the March 26 event:

PBS News Hour

3/26/2022

7:34 PM ET

Judy Woodruff: This week’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing, it’s almost, Jonathan, the story of the two, it seemed like two nominees were sitting there, Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, to listen to the Democratic senators you would think she was a highly qualified woman who has been federal for nearly a decade. Worked in court. He is prone to crime by listening to Republicans, he tends to speak politely to people involved in child abuse. What have you done about the senators, the process, the nominated candidates?

Jonathan Caphart: How much time do we have with Judy? I know we don’t have much time. It’s as if we’re seeing, yes, the Supreme Court’s nomination hearing of Ketanji Brown Jackson, but also the relevance of the Supreme Court’s confirmation hearing for Justice Kavanagh on one level. Democrats want to remind people that Judge Jackson, the best judge at their level, deserves Judge Brown Jackson. How qualified she is to work in the high court, out of qualification and to be torn apart by Republicans, to shorten her experience, to tell her everything except the child of God, to tell a mother that she is not soft on crime, but with people pedalled in child pornography– Good. It was just awful.

And I think Senator Booker, who is more ambitious than I am, the speech that made him cry, I would have cried, if my father-in-law and my mother-in-law had not sat in the living room as we see it. . I felt it in my bones when I saw him wipe away the tears. Because I understood where that emotion was coming from.

You know, in the black community, we — we – call everyone a brother or sister. That brother is there, that sister — that sister is there. And it wasn’t really before I saw it, I really understood what that meant. I’m almost three years older than Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson. I am not the only child. I don’t know him. I did not meet him. But seeing him sitting there, we’re looking at that picture now, I thought, look, I’m watching– watching a relative go through hell. And Senator Booker reminded him but reminded the country why he was there, how hard he worked, how deserving he was and how important it was not to let anyone take away his joy. She loves her country. He is being interviewed for a job he has always wanted and still people there are trashing him in various ways, we as African-Americans work hard to get to these spots and stay in these spots. And-and– have to jump through these hoops and be interrogated by people who are not even at our level. But still we have to get up in the tent, get a seat at the table and then put that seat.

Woodruff: What did you do?

David Brooks: Yes, well, I’m very inspired by it.

Woodruff: Yes.

Brooks: You know, we have a bunch of Republican senators who aren’t really senators. They are merely TV hosts and they use these hearings as an occasion for any issue popular with money. And so is it “What is a woman?” Or whatever, they will ask him about it. They’re not going to ask him about judicial philosophy, they’re not going to ask him about mood, they’re going to ask him what the problem is at the moment. And it has reached its apogee with Ted Cruz, whom I told nicely last week, going back this week.

Woodruff: We don’t remember that.

Brooks: – She, she makes– a big carafe and then leans back and checks out how she’s doing on Twitter. It’s like the perfect cycle of narcissists. And so these are not hearings. On the issue of child pornography, Andy McCarthy, a conservative writer for the National Review who has been a prosecutor for 20 years, says his position should not be a mandatory minimum for people who have only a handful of child pornography. And that’s the ideal position, because some people, they’re stupid and they do terrible things but they shouldn’t get at least five years because they’re not fundamentally criminals and so it’s McCarthy’s case and that’s his case, but Hawley, Josh Hawley treats it like he’s a child. Soft about torture. So, this is just a distortion of the record.

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